Image series 08 / 2011: series

A master rediscovered

15 February 2011 | By: Hendrikje Hüneke

Start image

Today the Dutch artist Gabriel Metsu (1629-1667) is playing a second fiddle to his famous contemporary Vermeer. In contrast he was one of the foremost genre-painters during the Golden Age. In the 18th and 19th century paintings by Metsu were sold at high prices and were more popular than the works by Vermeer.
An exhibition in Amsterdam, open until the middle of march, is inviting to rediscover this artist.

Gabriel Metsu. A master rediscovered, until 21th march 2011, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

01

Metsu, Gabriel: Briefschreibender Mann (Detail), um 1655/60, Öl auf Holz, 28 × 26 cm, Musée Fabre, Montpellier; Digitale Diathek, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Gießen

02

Metsu, Gabriel: Malendes Mädchen (Detail), 1657-59, Öl auf Holz, 36,3 × 30,7 cm, o.O.; ArteMIS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Kunsthistorisches Institut, München

03

Metsu, Gabriel: Geschenk des Jägers (Detail) , um 1657/61, Öl auf Leinwand, 51 × 48 cm, Amsterdam; ArteMIS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Kunsthistorisches Institut, München

04

Metsu, Gabriel: Das kranke Kind (Detail) um 1660, Öl auf Leinwand, 32,2 × 27,2 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; Digitale Diathek, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Gießen

05

Metsu, Gabriel: Das Katzenfrühstück (Detail), 1661-66, Öl auf Holz, 33,5 × 27 cm, Amsterdam; ArteMIS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Kunsthistorisches Institut, München

06

Metsu, Gabriel: Der Briefschreiber (Detail), um 1665, Öl auf Holz, National Gallery of Art, Dublin; DigiDiathek, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Gießen

07

Metsu, Gabriel: Die Briefleserin (Detail), um 1665, Öl auf Holz, National Gallery of Art, Dublin; DigiDiathek, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Gießen

08

Metsu, Gabriel: Frau bei ihrer Toilette (Detail), um 1685, Öl auf Holz, Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena; Diathek online, Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Dresden